Faroe Islands - When and where to visit


Climate
When to visit
Highlights

Climate

The statement that the Faroes can experience all four seasons in just one day may well have become a cliché over the years, yet it remains a fact with which any visitor to the islands will become all too familiar. A morning may start out beautifully sunny and warm, only for dark menacing clouds to roll in off the Atlantic within an hour or so, and by lunchtime it’s pouring with rain. Then, slowly, the clouds disperse, there’s a brilliant rainbow, and the sun comes out again by mid afternoon – only for the wind to pick up by evening and almost knock you flat. Faroese weather is certainly very changeable and it pays to be one step ahead and have raingear with you at all times. Don’t forget that if the weather turns, it’s alarmingly easy to become stranded on one island or another (it has happened to me on several occasions) with no choice but to batten down the hatches and sit it out.

When to visit

Undoubtedly the best time to be in the Faroes is during the long days of summer. From May to the end of July, when the evenings are light and the weather is at its most stable, the islands show their best side: wild flowers grow amid the deep-green tussocky grass of the valley slopes, the waterfalls glisten against the patchwork of whites and blues of the northern sky and everywhere the air is heavy with the scent of freshly mown hay and full of the calls of thousands of birds. August and September, too, are delightful months to be in the islands; the days, though, are still long and can be pleasantly warm. September, in particular, can be a great time to have the islands to yourself; most other tourists have left and you can hike without seeing a soul and experience the unsullied Faroese nature totally undisturbed. However, the weather now is on the change and the first of the winter storms is never far away. Although autumn, and especially winter, are not ideally suited to tourism in the Faroes, there is nevertheless a certain masochistic pleasure to be gained from being buffeted by winds and rain, the intensity of which you will probably never have experienced before. The downside, of course, is that daylight is scarce at this time of year, and in December and January, it’s already starting to get dark around 14.00–14.30 – it’s black by 14.30–15.00. Under a fresh fall of snow, the elemental beauty of the Faroese landscapes of mountain peaks and deep valleys is certainly breathtaking, but it’s worth remembering that many attractions are closed or inaccessible during the long winter months. Spring brings a new lease of life to the islands, and daffodils and snowdrops are in full bloom in the Faroes way before they even start to peek out of the ground in Iceland, for example, barely an hour’s flight to the north. March and April are incredibly satisfying months to visit the country – not only can you appreciate the fresh leaves on the trees and the newly opened flowers, but the birds are starting to return, a sure sign that spring has arrived.

Highlights

The Faroe Islands have three things in plenty: vast areas of unspoilt mountainous terrain perfect for hiking; vertical sea cliffs teeming with birdlife ideal for ornithologists; and picturesque villages of wooden houses topped with turf roofs waiting to be discovered. If you have only a couple of days in the Faroes, it makes sense to concentrate on the capital, Tórshavn, and the immediate vicinity, perhaps adding in a visit to the medieval cathedral at Kirkjubøur or a boat trip across to Nólsoy. With a little more time, it’s definitely worth seeing the spectacular bird cliffs at Vestmanna, a boat tour every visitor to the islands should try to make, and taking a trip anywhere by helicopter – most dramatically past the remote outpost of Stóra Dímun. An ideal week’s holiday in the islands could include all the above plus a trip to Mykines to see the puffins and gannets or a visit to Klaksvík and a tour of the northern islands – a hike out to one of the world’s tallest vertical sea cliffs, Enniberg on Viðoy, or an unforgettable boat trip across stormy seas to the island of Fugloy where there are some wonderful coastlines to discover (returning by helicopter if you can), or a hike out to the lighthouse on northern Kalsoy for the best views anywhere in the country. With two weeks at your disposal it’s well worth considering hiking, perhaps on Vágar or Suðuroy and touring the villages of Streymoy and Eysturoy, in particular Saksun, Tjørnuvík and Gjógv.

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