view-countries-simple.phtml

Akraberg - A view from our expert author


Akraberg Faroe Islands by Shutterstock/Andrea RicordiAkraberg lighthouse, Suðuroy. Landscape of the southernmost point of the Faroe Islands archipelago. © Andrea Ricordi, Shutterstock

This wonderfully remote rocky promontory, which juts out proudly into the crashing waves of the North Atlantic, is a suitably enigmatic spot.

From Sumba, it’s barely another 2km along the road which climbs up out of the village to Akraberg and the most southerly point of the Faroe Islands. This wonderfully remote rocky promontory, which juts out proudly into the crashing waves of the North Atlantic, is a suitably enigmatic spot. At the end of the road there’s a picnic table and a viewpoint. It’s thought that the original inhabitants of Akraberg were heathen Frisians who never converted to Christianity – there are legends about them in Faroese folklore – and that they survived here through piracy from around 1040 to 1350, when they succumbed to the Black Death. Their settlement was down on the shoreline and has long since vanished into the sea. In more recent times during World War II, British soldiers were regularly here, maintaining the lighthouse and a radar station which scanned the sea and skies south of the Faroes; some of the pillboxes they built as part of anti-invasion preparations are still standing.

Back to the top

Faroe Islands articles

View all

The world’s remotest islands

Want to get really off grid? Check out our favourite remarkable remote islands from around the world. 

Read more...

Faroe from the madding crowd

On her trip to the Faroe Islands, editor Laura expected to be bowled over by the never-ending landscapes. What she didn’t expect, though, was the innovative food.

Read more...

KOKS – a culinary adventure

At KOKS, dinner is so much more than just a meal.

Read more...

Related guides and other books

View all