view-countries-simple.phtml

Lower Essequibo River - A view from our expert author


The Essequibo is a grand, beautifully moody river that transports the brown muddy waters from wide reaches of Guyana.

From its humble source in the Acarai Mountains along Guyana’s southern border with Brazil, the Essequibo River flows north for more than 600 miles – winding, twisting and roaring through savannas and tropical forests along the way – until its mouth opens up some 20 miles (32km) in width and it spills into the Atlantic Ocean. During its journey, the Essequibo, which is Guyana’s largest river, and South America’s third-largest (behind the Amazon and Orinoco), flows aroundsome 365 different islands. The three largest – Wakenaam, Leguan and Hog – create a large tongue in the Essequibo’s mouth. Together their girth measures nearly 60 square miles; alone the islands are larger than some of the famed Caribbean countries to the north.

Many of Guyana’s other great rivers flow into the Essequibo, including the Cuyuni, Mazaruni, Potaro, Rupununi and the Siparuni. The Essequibo is a grand, beautifully moody river that transports the brown muddy waters from wide reaches of Guyana. It was the area that attracted Guyana’s first European settlers and its lower section (from its mouth to just past Bartica, some 50 miles to the south) continues to bustle with activity and is easily accessible for visitors. A trip, which combines two or three  locations, is the best way to experience this section of the Essequibo.

The east bank of the Essequibo River is more easily accessible in that the public river taxis that travel between Parika and Bartica follow this side and are willing to
drop passengers at locations along the route.

Between some serious bouts of relaxing the various resorts here offer nature trails though pristine forest and many water-based activities: kayaking up small creeks, fishing trips, pedal boating, water skiing and wake boarding.

Back to the top

Guyana articles

View all

Jonestown

Author Kirk Smock tells the tragic story behind Jonestown and its victims.

Read more...

Yachting in Guyana

Guyana is developing as a destination for yachters.

Read more...

Amerindian craft

Author Kirk Smock writes about traditional and non-traditional handicrafts produced by Amerindian communities in Guyana.

Read more...

Related guides and other books

View all